News & Stories
Wildlife on the Move: Protecting Landscape Connections One Parcel at A Time

Wildlife on the Move: Protecting Landscape Connections One Parcel at A Time

Animals such as bear, moose and bobcat need large, undeveloped areas to survive. Vermont’s land links wildlife habitat between New York, New England, and Canada. Many people and groups are working hard to protect wildlife corridors so these animals can survive, and thrive. Join us as we explore these corridors and the threats facing animals. We’ll take a closer look at the Shutesville Hill Wildlife Corridor in Waterbury and Stowe.

Ecology, Conservation, and Forest Management at the Andrews Community Forest

Ecology, Conservation, and Forest Management at the Andrews Community Forest

How do you improve habitat for wildlife, increase a forest’s diversity, complexity, and ability to adapt to climate change–all while protecting sensitive and unique ecological features? Join Vermont Coverts and Vermont Woodlands, who are hosting VLT’s Liza Walker and Caitlin Cusack to answer your questions about conservation and conservation easements.

Coffee with a Conservationist

Coffee with a Conservationist

If you are considering conserving your land with a land trust or currently have an easement on your property this webinar is for you! Join Vermont Coverts and Vermont Woodlands, who are hosting VLT’s Liza Walker and Caitlin Cusack to answer your questions about conservation and conservation easements.

How a Chipmunk Baby Boom Leads to More Mushrooms

How a Chipmunk Baby Boom Leads to More Mushrooms

When I went out to look for edible mushrooms in a stand of oaks, beech, and hemlocks recently, I found uprooted, overturned, and torn-apart mushrooms everywhere. It looked like a tiny hurricane had targeted only the fungi. A closer look revealed rodent toothmarks. Small mammals like chipmunks and red squirrels feed on mushrooms; the scene of destruction might be explained by this year’s chipmunk baby boom, which was spurred by high seed production in oaks and beeches in 2019.