Aerial view of forests and hills with state route running through it - Many animals, such as the gray fox, need to be able to move safely between the Greens and Worcester mountains.

Space for Wildlife

The woods around Waterbury and Stowe are welcoming a secretive resident. Gray fox are finding refuge in the Shutesville Hill Wildlife Corridor, which VLT is working to safeguard with local, statewide and international partners.

man pointing towards camera in group of men examining trees and shrubs in wooded area - Members of a community group in the Brattleboro area are taking action to help native species thrive.

Helping Native Plant Species Thrive

In Vermont, invasives threaten the state’s sugaring, forestry, and recreation industries—and even our health. VLT is helping to establish a Cooperative Invasive Species Management Association (CISMA) in southeast Vermont, using land it owns in Brattleboro to demonstrate management approaches.

woman farmer standing in her vineyard - Working with her seven-person team, Krista’s already planted 2,000 vines in Isle La Motte.

The Sky’s the Limit

VLT has raised $15 million to put 200 new farmers on the land over the next decade. As part of this effort, VLT is leasing land in Isle La Motte to Krista Scruggs for her farm business.

Father and two young sons standing in field of Christmas trees

A New Farm Business in Springfield

Experienced farmers Matthew Kurek and Maggie Wood are growing organic vegetables at Farm on the River, along the Connecticut River. They conserved the farm, protecting it for future farming and to improve water quality and habitat.

aerial view of farm fields, pasture,and hills

Brewster Uplands: Uniting beauty and public good

It’s summer in Jeffersonville, and the woodlands along the Brewster River are buzzing with cicadas. Children splash in the gorge below Vermont’s historic Grist Mill Covered Bridge. Visitors flock to the trails beyond, seeking shade and the chance to socialize, from a distance.

fall foliage with hills in distance and shining clouds

A Local Solution with a Global Impact

“Ten Vermont forestland owners, managing over 8,600 acres, are participating in the national, voluntary carbon market, earning $25 to $47 per acre, per year for the first ten years,” says Charlie Hancock, consulting forester and board member of Cold Hollow to Canada and VLT Trustee.