Aerial view of forests and hills with state route running through it - Many animals, such as the gray fox, need to be able to move safely between the Greens and Worcester mountains.

Space for Wildlife

The woods around Waterbury and Stowe are welcoming a secretive resident. Gray fox are finding refuge in the Shutesville Hill Wildlife Corridor, which VLT is working to safeguard with local, statewide and international partners.

Father and two young sons standing in field of Christmas trees

A New Farm Business in Springfield

Experienced farmers Matthew Kurek and Maggie Wood are growing organic vegetables at Farm on the River, along the Connecticut River. They conserved the farm, protecting it for future farming and to improve water quality and habitat.

view of hills with fall foliage

100th Wildlife Management Area Established in Shrewsbury

On the hilly land where Shrewsbury’s town farm stood in centuries past, a thick forest of sugar maples, birch, and oak lays undisturbed by roads and development. Residents like to visit—drawn by the wooded hush—to hike or hunt. It’s a special place for animals, too. With three state forests nearby, the woods are part of a vast swath of wildlife habitat.

How a Chipmunk Baby Boom Leads to More Mushrooms

When I went out to look for edible mushrooms in a stand of oaks, beech, and hemlocks recently, I found uprooted, overturned, and torn-apart mushrooms everywhere. It looked like a tiny hurricane had targeted only the fungi. A closer look revealed rodent toothmarks. Small mammals like chipmunks and red squirrels feed on mushrooms; the scene of destruction might be explained by this year’s chipmunk baby boom, which was spurred by high seed production in oaks and beeches in 2019.