man pointing towards camera in group of men examining trees and shrubs in wooded area - Members of a community group in the Brattleboro area are taking action to help native species thrive.

Helping Native Plant Species Thrive

In Vermont, invasives threaten the state’s sugaring, forestry, and recreation industries—and even our health. VLT is helping to establish a Cooperative Invasive Species Management Association (CISMA) in southeast Vermont, using land it owns in Brattleboro to demonstrate management approaches.

aerial view of farm fields, pasture,and hills

Brewster Uplands: Uniting beauty and public good

It’s summer in Jeffersonville, and the woodlands along the Brewster River are buzzing with cicadas. Children splash in the gorge below Vermont’s historic Grist Mill Covered Bridge. Visitors flock to the trails beyond, seeking shade and the chance to socialize, from a distance.

fall foliage with hills in distance and shining clouds

A Local Solution with a Global Impact

“Ten Vermont forestland owners, managing over 8,600 acres, are participating in the national, voluntary carbon market, earning $25 to $47 per acre, per year for the first ten years,” says Charlie Hancock, consulting forester and board member of Cold Hollow to Canada and VLT Trustee.

How a Chipmunk Baby Boom Leads to More Mushrooms

When I went out to look for edible mushrooms in a stand of oaks, beech, and hemlocks recently, I found uprooted, overturned, and torn-apart mushrooms everywhere. It looked like a tiny hurricane had targeted only the fungi. A closer look revealed rodent toothmarks. Small mammals like chipmunks and red squirrels feed on mushrooms; the scene of destruction might be explained by this year’s chipmunk baby boom, which was spurred by high seed production in oaks and beeches in 2019.